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Marketing is Everything Your Company Does

August 12, 2011

Mindjet is just mindblowing. I had an experience with them that I have to relate. I am always looking for new ways to express thoughts and ideas. I have had friends and colleagues use Mindjet in meetings before and never thought much of mind-mapping software.

mindjet logoBut I have been working on a project that is about 80% repeatable for other clients, and I did not want to start setting up flow diagrams in Powerpoint because it is such a pain to re-arrange them. So I thought I would try some of the mind-mapping programs.

I downloaded a couple different ones for their free trials, and while I liked the look and feel of Mindjet, it kept doing some things I didn’t like. I  did not have time to figure out how to not have it do those things.  (I am not a read-the-manual person.  If the software isn’t intuitive enough for me to figure out, I move on till I find something that is.)  I found another program that was similar, and that I could figure out. It wasn’t as elegant as Mindjet, but it got the job done that I needed.  End of story… except…. This morning I got this email:

Dan,

“My name is Kevin James, and I work with small businesses with 1-10 employees and individuals.  My primary goal here at Mindjet is to help new trial users like you quickly understand how they can they can become successful with our tools.

To best support your success with Mindjet, are you free for a quick 10-15 minute discussion?

At your convenience, please let me know what works best for you.

Best Regards,

Kevin James”

Now, I have downloaded dozens of free trials over the year, but I never gotten a letter like this from a vendor who’s product costs $249. They are offering me support on a trial?

Kevin’s phone number was also included, so this afternoon when I had a few minutes, I called him. He answered the phone. Looked me up and said “how can I help you?”  I explained my issue with what was happening in the diagram I was trying to create. He opened a Go-to-meeting session. He gave me screen control, and I showed him what was happening.  In a 10 minute conversation, he showed me what I needed as well as showed me 2 or 3 other tips that would help. He aslo offered to have me sit in on some new user coaching sessions and never sold me hard on anything.

So this company that I found through a google search, who’s screen look I recognized, did the following:

  • They made it easy for me to try – I didn’t have to give a credit card or anything much to get the download.  I could have given a false email and phone and it still would have worked.
  • It was a full use demo for 30 days.  No restricted functionality.
  • They emailed me politely with an offer to help
  • They answered the phone when I took them up on their offer
  • They actually helped and offered useful, insightful, information
  • They did not push for the order and said that if I decided to buy, to call him back as they have different specials that go on.

All this for a $249 sale. I think they really understand the small business person. And they truly understand that marketing is so much more than just getting a lead. It is the entire experience that a prospect and customer has with the company.

What a tremendously great experience from a company I had never interacted with before. Will I buy? probably. Do I think they are a great example to follow? Absolutely.

Dan Kraus
Written by Dan Kraus

With more than two decades of experience in sales, marketing, and go-to-market strategies, Dan Kraus has developed a deep portfolio of experiences that he now uses to help small businesses profitably grow their businesses. As an entrepreneur, Dan understands the challenges of growing a business with limited capital and human resources. As a line of business manager in larger companies such as SAP America and Great Plains Software (now part of Microsoft), his experience launching new business ventures inside reputable organizations established his reputation as a creative and effective executive that could both plan and execute within corporate confines.

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